Eaton Hamilton

the problem with being trans is cis people. The problem with being queer is straight people. The problem with being disabled is abled people. The problem with being Black is white people. In other words, prejudice.

Tag: art

Grants in Canada

sketch: Eaton Hamilton, some years ago

Happy Sunday! It’s a chilly, rainy day where I am, but just outside my window, the first of the clematis armandii are beginning to open. If it were a dry dry, there might be enough of them open at dusk to send out their redolence, which always makes me swoon.

The young lilacs are still sulking but the one I cherish, which has darker blooms, has come into its own finally! I am going to dig up a sucker and replant that hoping for a new plant but in a pot.

Today I am thinking about grants in Canada. The subsistence level is stuck at only $2000/month. One is supposed to devote oneself to the grant, but no one can support themselves on $24,000/year any longer in this country. That’s a studio apt or, if really lucky, a 1-bedroom apartment in Vancouver (and certainly where I live), and that doesn’t even begin to factor in hydro, gas, phone/s, cable, taxes, food, gas or car repairs/bus passes. So if all a recipient can do is worry how they’re going to manage, they’re not able to concentrate on the matters at hand–creating their art.

This means that anyone trying to live on the amount of a grant as their only income is SOL. It’s not possible. Which then implies that most grants are going to wealthier people who aren’t depending on them to get through their month. What I mean is these folks must have other money like investments or a partner’s income to rely on, which means by not increasing these subsistence amounts Canada is guaranteeing a problem with equal access for all.

I’m saying it here first: Grant subsistence amounts need to double, but fast.

This week

drawing by: Eaton Hamilton

My kid had a birthday and took her children snowboarding for their first time–lucky ducks. They both loved it, and staying overnight at a hotel, too. The older child, 7, has fallen for independent reading in the worst way, doing exactly what both her mom and I did as kids, walking around with her book clutched in her hands, not willing to exit the story long enough to eat or interact.

I find that thrilling, I think because reading’s always been such a joy for me as well. “She reads a book a night,” her mom said, so I asked how she manages to keep up with the demand. “The library.”

Me, I’ve finished prepping the garden beds for spring thanks to a lovely sunny day yesterday, which thrills me except I’m so stiff I can no longer walk. So good to dig my hands into the loam. I swear I’m hungry for this by March, but the earth is usually too damned cold. Not this year where I live and love.

Next for power washing and a dump run and the outside will be in tip top shape. I moved my canvases from inside to the storage shed, where they’re set up with a dehumidifier. Glad that’s done. Next step is moving inside, where I will declutter, de-spider-web, and give the place a good going over. That should take some weeks.

Spring cleaning. Or should I say accounting avoidance?

I just got buzzed by a hummer telling me it’s time to change the nectar in the feeders–quite rightly. They know. So the new nectar is cooling in the measuring cup on the stove.

I have to create a grant application in the next couple weeks. I was trying to come up with a name for the new project and I realized I’d thought up a great title for a book a couple weeks ago and noted it down. I was wondering what the scope of the project should be–its defining scaffolding, if you will–and I went in search of that book title. There it was, not just the title, but as soon as I read the title again, the book itself announced itself, its range, tip to toe, where it begins and where it ends.

Also relieving.

I got a cheque for royalties for my old memoir, too. Good to know it’s still selling!

How are things down your way, here on the spring equinox, when days and nights are the same lengths? At least at this time of year we have the beautiful resurgence of spring. The first cherry blossoms here where I live are popping! They are perhaps my all-time favourite and most cheering sight.

I hope you see them where you are and I hope they give you hope and forebearance.

It’s been a great writing week; how about you?

painting by: Eaton Hamilton 2021; middle-aged Gertrude Stein

I don’t know if I mentioned this, but halfway through my memoir writing time, I decided to punt the book and start over. Something had been niggling at me for months, and that something was suggesting it wasn’t working. It finally barrelled to the front of my brain and I began over. I frequently do this with books, which is why I’ve written 3x more than I’ve tried to have published. I already have 10K words done. This week could be a washout, though, due to other challenges.

I hope your holidays were good ones. I don’t really celebrate Christmas, but this year is snowy and desperately cold and I’m certainly watching the weather, at least and hoping the power doesn’t go out. The wind just came up, one of the forecast gusts, I guess. Most of my time seems to be used bringing in hummingbird feeders to blow-dry them into thaw before setting them back out. The hummers–must be 20-30, all squabbling–are desperate.

As always you can follow daily paintings on IG at hamiltonart1000 and also join my Patreon for weekly chats on writing and painting (Hamilton Art)!

The holidays

painting: Eaton Hamilton 2018

We are swiftly approaching the shortest day of the year, but, today, everything where I live feels springlike and I feel that awkward-in-December urge to get out and start spring cleanup. Summer roses near the warmth of the house are still blooming. The hummingbirds asked for a change of nectar (they come hover in front of my face when they need my services), which I provided. They are feeling gay and glorious and I think their instincts may be turning them toward nest-building. We’ll see. I hope they hold off. I hope I do.

I had one of those burning bush moments last night, an epiphany about the structure of my work-in-progress. These work epiphanies are double-sided: fabulous because hello, solution; difficult because it means a ton of work ahead, right? I got out of bed to go retrieve my computer and set things up on Scrivener so I’d have a scaffolding to follow in the morning if the idea held water.

It held water.

Quick Sketches

It’s been more than two years since I was able to attend a sketching class, because of hand and wrist arthritis and general malaise, but yesterday it occurred to me after doing a workshop with the London Drawing Group (botanicals, watercolour) that I might find online ateliers with timed poses, as I’m mostly a figurative artist. I was lucky and found several. It’s so very good to exercise these muscles again, and I’m grateful to the hosts. As always, should you wish to purchase a print of anything you see, please follow the contact link. Here are some quick sketches, mostly one, two or four minutes:

Quick figurative sketches from online drawing sessions.

Torso

Covid-19 has stolen my voice. I went silent in March and am still mostly silent. I live alone so not seeing people makes this more severe. I’m struggling to write. Maybe I don’t believe there’s a reason any longer, though one could certainly argue that there’s never been a more vital time to lift your voice. I am trying every day to lift mine.

I find solace in making art. I’ve been doing a month-long art journal for the first time since I was in art school, when I would sometimes keep one for a particular class. It’s been instructive. This torso reminds me that creating torsos was an original love of mine and probably what I would have worked on if I had expanded into sculpture.

 

New essays up at Medium!

image by Jessica Poundstone for Gay Magazine

I’m moving some of my essays onto Medium for your reading pleasure! Here’s what’s there so far:

The Pleasure Scale, Gay Magazine, about how, as a near shut-in, I find pleasure

The Preludes to Assault, about a short encounter with Jian Ghomeshi, and sexual violence

The Nothing Between Your Legs, about my non-binary life as a girl in the 1950s; first published in Autostraddle

A Night of Art and Anti-Art, about a walk on beach one evening with Liz

Three portraits

Three of my portraits are hung at Dragonfly Art on Salt Spring Island. Great to see faces that aren’t heterosexual on a wall, I must admit. Quick iPhone pic.

The photograph is of three acrylic oil paintings of non-binary people hanging on a display wall.

A recent portrait…

charcoal and acrylic on canvas 11×16

Love Will (Still) Burst Into a Thousand Shapes

“…The next section of the collection following the one focused on artists is “Our Terrible Good Luck,” an apt oxymoron that encompasses the devastation that populates these poems on topics not often associated that kind of horror: motherhood and children. Oh boy, was this part of the collection hard for me. They’re just shattering to read: domestic abuse, the death of children, gun violence, mass murderers, the dark sides of motherhood, the physicality and sometimes grotesqueness of child birth. For me, they were painful and difficult to read, despite their being beautifully written. When I say devastating, this is what I mean:

In the month before they find your son’s body

downstream, you wake imagining

his fist clutching the spent elastic

of his pyjama bottoms, the pair with sailboats riding them

He’s swimming past your room toward milk and Cheerios

his cowlick alive on his small head, swimming

toward cartoons and baseballs, toward his skateboard

paddling his feet like flippers. You’re surprised

by how light he is, how his lips shimmer like water

how his eyes glow green as algae

He amazes you again and again, how he breathes

through water. Every morning you almost drown

fighting the undertow, the wild summer runoff

coughing into air exhausted, but your son is happy

He’s learning the language of gills and fins

of minnows and fry. That’s what he says

when you try to pull him to safety; he says he’s a stuntman

riding the waterfall down its awful lengths

to the log jam at the bottom pool

He’s cool to the touch; his beauty has you by the throat

He’s translucent, you can see his heart under

his young boy’s ribs, beating

as it once beat under the stretched skin of your belly

blue as airlessness, primed for vertical dive

HOLY FUCK, Jane Eaton Hamilton. I don’t remember the last time I read a poem so fucking sad and heartbreaking.” -Casey Stepaniuk

New Painting

Jane Eaton Hamilton: 8×8 conte on mixed media paper 2017

Nietzsche: the why of art

Jane Eaton Hamilton

“We have art so that we shall not die of reality.” –Nietzsche

Nuits d’oiseaux (2014)

A little something in French…

wordy-bird-2016-jeh

NUITS D’OISEAUX by Jane Eaton Hamilton

Traduit de l’anglais (Canada) par Cécile Oumhani

 

Voici une histoire. Elle est vraie, mais elle est aussi pleine de mensonges. Et de hachures, le genre qui laisse de tout petits quadrillages sur les cœurs.

1)

Un chirurgien a ouvert la poitrine de ma femme et lui a retiré son sein : des points et des agrafes. C’était il y a plusieurs années. Pendant qu’elle dort la fermeture éclair de sa cicatrice s’ouvre (ruban rallonge du haut, vis de butée supérieure, curseur, tirette), sa chair s’ouvre comme un sac de couchage. Certaines nuits je ne vois que les baleines de corsets qui entourent ses poumons, des éclats de lune luisants dans un ciel rouge foncé, et je fais une prière pour eux, ces pâles nervures de canoë, ces baguettes à ramasser qui sont tout ce qui la sangle. J’aimerais pouvoir faire ça : j’aimerais pouvoir la maintenir. Certaines nuits je crois qu’elle pourrait partir dans toutes les directions, nord, est, sud, ouest, une énorme éclaboussure. Elle ira si loin si vite que je pourrai juste regarder la bouche ouverte. Elle sera partie, et tout ce que j’aurai c’est un grand gâchis rouge à nettoyer et un éclat de côte qui sortira de mon œil.

2)

Les arbres à carquois sont assez étranges de toute façon, mais ajoutez-y le nid d’un Républicain social et vous serez dans un vrai pétrin visuel. Des furoncles verruqueux qui ressemblent à des toffees, ces copropriétés d’oiseaux faits d’herbes sèches ont plus de cent trous différents pour chaque famille ; les nids peuvent abriter quatre cents oiseaux. Il est intéressant de noter que les Républicains sociaux sont polyamoureux, et ont même, apparemment des relations avec des barbus et des fringillidés.

Au Namaqualand, les Tisserins du Cap se suffisent à eux mêmes. Les mâles courtisent les femelles en tissant des sacs qui ressemblent à des testicules, et si une femelle reste indifférente, le mâle construit un deuxième sac sous le premier et ainsi de suite, jusqu’à ce qu’un coup de vent fasse tomber tout le tralala.

Chez les oiseaux, comme chez les humains – c’est pas mal de bousculades pour avoir la fille et la garder.

3)

Certaines nuits quand l’incision de ma femme défait sa fermeture éclair, une côte sort et dessus il y a un oiseau jaune perché, qui se balance comme par grand vent, les plumes ébouriffées en une crête jaune citron. J’adore les oiseaux. Cela me remplit de bonheur de l’entendre chanter, comme j’ai du bonheur lorsque ma femme chante. (Une fois au début que nous étions ensemble, ma femme a traversé la cuisine en dansant nue tout en chantant à tue-tête des chansons de groupes de filles des années 60). Le petit oiseau gazouille et trille, puis s’envole de la côte pour voler dans notre chambre. Il attrape un moustique près de mon oreille. Il volète dans les coins autour des luminaires, et rapporte des morceaux de fil qu’il tire dans les pull-overs, les toiles d’araignée, les pointes des étiquettes de plastique, les moutons. Il fait un nid, se glisse dedans en frissonnant, et pond de petits œufs gélatineux, des œufs dont je pense, de façon simple et candide, qu’ils deviendront des ganglions pour ma femme.

Ces nuits d’oiseaux, j’ai du bonheur, tant de bonheur. De façon implicite, je sais que le petit oiseau jaune sera de notre côté et je m’endors sur des trilles de chant d’oiseau mielleux.

4)

Je traîne sur les sites d’amis des oiseaux, où abondent les questions : Pourquoi mes inséparables changent-ils de couleur ? Les pucerons – mon oiseau n’a pas de problèmes avec eux, mais moi si ? Le picage des plumes d’inséparables ?

La perte de plumes dit Web Aviaire, est un problème difficile à traiter quand le comportement de picage est déjà installé. Il faudrait montrer les oiseaux au Dr Marshall dès les premiers signes de picage. Ma femme et moi nous piquons nos plumes. Nous ne sommes pas allées chez le Dr Marshall et c’est peut-être notre problème. Notre relation souffre d’infection buccale, de bactéries, d’une mauvaise alimentation. Ma femme et moi nous étions autrefois des inséparables. Autrefois, le temps d’une nanoseconde, Nous Deux N’étions qu’Un. Puis, pendant des années, Nous Deux Etions Un et Demi. A la fin, Nous Deux Etions Deux. Maintenant, tout porte à croire que Nous Pourrions Bien Etre Trois.

5)

Les oiseaux m’enchantent. Une fois nous avons emmené notre fille voir une volière, les Combles des Loriquets au parc national des oiseaux de Jurong à Singapour. Un parc de vingt hectares sur un flanc de colline entièrement dédié aux oiseaux, c’est la garantie qu’une personne comme moi aura le vertige. Les loriquets ressemblent à de petits perroquets et dans les volières, alors que vous poussez des cris, vous vous tortillez et criez encore en passant sur des ponts suspendus, venus de haut dans les arbres, ils se posent sur vous, ils vous couvrent. C’est comme si les gardiens étaient installés sur le toit en train de vider des tubes de peinture sur vous, orange-cadmium, bleu cobalt, carmin et vert viridin, des couleurs territoriales criardes avec beaucoup de battements d’ailes et de coups de bec.

Les ornithologues au parc répondent à des questions comme : Est-ce qu’un œuf d’autruche résiste au poids d’un adulte humain ? Je me débats avec celle-ci : Est-ce que mon cœur humain résistera au poids changeant des allégeances de ma femme ?

6)

Recherche : La Manière d’offrir Stimulation Mentale et Bonheur à Votre Femme

C’est moi qui recherche. Regardez-moi certains soirs quand je passe en revue les billets de théâtre (Wicked ! Les Monologues du Vagin ! Avenue Q ! Mon Année de Pensée Magique !) et les expositions dans les musées (Dali : Peinture et cinéma ; Picasso et la Grande-Bretagne : Carr, O’Keefe, Kahlo : leurs lieux) et les détritus qui sortent de sa cicatrice, qui bougent dans des lapins mécaniques et des poupées vaudou qui dégringolent et se libèrent, tous les secrets et la souffrance qu’elle garde profondément enfouis en elle.

Qu’est-ce que je cherche ? Quelque chose à manger peut-être. Des graines pour les oiseaux. Un steak.

7)

Nous avons rencontré une femme en Namibie qui avait perdu presque tout un sein suite à l’attaque d’un crocodile. Elle appartenait à une tribu polygame, les Himba, dont les femmes ne portent que des pagnes. Elle s’était penchée sur la rivière avec sa gourde à eau, les seins pendant comme ils pendent quand on a eu une flopée d’enfants, et les dents d’un croco s’étaient refermées sur son sein droit.

Qui sait ce que le mari de cette femme pense quand il prend dans sa main son sein droit desséché et massacré par un croco ? Retrace-t-il son histoire avec respect ? Crache-t-il de dégoût et choisit-il une autre épouse ?

8)

Il y a ici des histoires d’épouses qui se changent dans la salle de bain, portent des soutien-gorge et des prothèses au lit, et des maris qui se détournent d’elles. Il y a des histoires de désintégrations maritales, et par là je veux dire ce à quoi vous pensez probablement : le mariage hétérosexuel. Je ne connais pas les statistiques des ruptures de mariages homosexuels après un cancer du sein. Ce que je sais, c’est que même après douze ans, quand ma femme ou moi nous passons devant la Cancer Agency, sans même penser à ce qui est arrivé, alors que nous sommes en route vers d’autres rendez-vous et en plein bonheur, l’une ou l’autre de nous deux fond en larmes.

9)

Vancouver a des meurtres de corbeaux et notre maison est sur leur trajet. Si vous sortez alors que l’aube commence à poindre, comme lorsque vous sortez pour une chimio, ils remplissent un ciel à la Hitchcock de leurs cris noirs, et si vous pouviez les compter, vous manqueriez de chiffres avant de manquer d’oiseaux. Les corbeaux ne sont pas protégés en Colombie Britannique, et la forêt qui leur servait de perchoir a été récemment arrachée pour construire un supermarché Costco ; maintenant des dizaines de milliers d’entre eux perchent dans un enchevêtrement de fils électriques et de palettes de matériaux de constructions. Le bruit qu’ils font est assourdissant.

10)

Le réalisme magique mis à part, la cicatrice de ma femme est vraiment juste une cicatrice, ordinaire, quelconque, qui a pâli avec le temps. (Ordinaire, quelconque. Je vous le dis. Ordinaire et quelconque.) Voici la vérité de piéton : elle est un peu concave là où il y avait son sein avant, un nid qu’on a creusé. Elle a fait le choix de ne pas se faire faire de reconstruction. Son unique sein est très petit et elle ne porte pas de soutien-gorge et de prothèse, ce qui est une histoire à voix haute, en fait, la seule partie qui hurle dans son histoire de piéton, frappée de réalité ; elle n’a à l’évidence qu’un sein, et cela se voit quand elle porte des t-shirts et elle fait masculine, alors les gens la regardent. La semaine dernière à un vernissage, un petit garçon d’environ sept ans s’est arrêté net alors qu’il courait et il a promené son regard sur elle de bas en haut, de haut en bas, essayant de lui faire comprendre.

(En ce moment, je fais la même chose, je passe mes yeux sur elle. Le petit garçon a raison. Elle ne comprend plus. Elle est toujours en train de dire au revoir à ses actions alors qu’elle dit bonjour avec ses lèvres qui sourient.)

11)

Mon cœur est une grosse et vieille pompe à sang dont certains endroits sont engorgés comme un ballon (j’ai une grosse et vieille cardiomyopathie pour toi, dis-je parfois à ma femme, mais en fait c’est une insuffisance cardiaque.) Mon cœur est en train d’abandonner, et il a des taches de nécrose qui ressemblent à de la rougeole, des morceaux morts qui sont morts depuis vingt-cinq ans, quel anniversaire ! Faisons un gâteau avec des bougies, joyeuse nécrose à moi !) Parlant de ma circulation sanguine, un cardiologue m’a dit une fois : l’arbre que vous êtes est en train de mourir. Nul doute que vous avez eu trop de Républicains sociables polyamoureux ? Comment vous sentez-vous ? Mon thérapeute m’a questionné sur nos vies, notre relation – oui – les seins en l’air, trois seins en l’air, j’imagine, au lieu de quatre, et voici la réponse, la lettre à ma douleur : cela fait la même impression que mon cœur qui me lâche. Maintenant il balbutie en arythmie, mais il ne peut pas pomper à travers toutes ces émotions et les vieilles cicatrices qui ont lâché, alors il peut bien continuer à s’engorger jusqu’à ce que j’éclate comme un –

12)

Tumeur ?

13)

J’ai été autrefois la copropriétaire d’un cacatoès qui s’appelait Hemingway. Hemingway avait l’habitude de sautiller sur mon os scapulaire et de picorer de la nourriture sur mes dents tout en perdant des plumes grises sur mes seins ? C’était un oiseau heureux avec une crête jaune, mais il n’a jamais écrit de grande nouvelle à ma connaissance.

14)

Au Cap de Bonne Espérance en Afrique du Sud, ma femme a couru vers des autruches pendant que le courant de Benguela lançait ses vagues sur la plage. Les autruches ont une griffe qui peut ouvrir quelqu’un aussi efficacement que la lame de n’importe quel chirurgien. Je me suis levée d’un bond, mais les autruches n’ont pas attaqué, elles ont seulement couru, en déployant leurs ailes mal développées. Puis le mâle s’est retourné et a envoyé d’un coup ma femme par terre. Il a dansé sur sa poitrine jusqu’à ce que son cerveau de la taille d’un petit pois s’en soit lassé.

Ce n’était qu’un jeu, rien qu’un jeu, m’a-t-elle assuré après, d’un air évasif, sans trop de peur. Je n’étais pas vraiment mort.

(C’est un mensonge).

15)

A Okonjima pour des guépards, j’ai été fascinée plutôt par les calaos – ces becs et ces casques ! Des calaos femelles utilisent leurs déjections pour s’enfermer dans leur nid. Je l’ai fait aussi, quand on a diagnostiqué le cancer de ma femme, mais j’ai utilisé un système d’alarme au lieu d’excréments. Je le fais encore, maintenant, mais j’utilise de l’éclairage périmétral, comme si des rayons lumineux brillant dans les ombres de ma femme protègeraient mon mariage.

16)

La peau de ma femme est engourdie, l’ai-je déjà mentionné ? Vous ne pensez pas que c’est la façon dont son esprit s’est guéri de tout ce traumatisme (syndrome de stress post-traumatique), avec une grosse et vieille zone engourdie ? A l’extérieur d’elle, des nerfs coupés deviennent parfois fous, comme un orchestre de la douleur, un cri de violon, une plainte de flûte. Yowey. Quand je suis allongée à côté d’elle et que je passe mon doigt sur sa poitrine, dans son aisselle, le long de la peau près de son bras sur son dos, elle ne sent rien du tout. Ici ? Dis-je et elle secoue la tête. Rien du tout. Ici ? Toujours rien. Ici ? Non. Ici ? Non, pas vraiment.

Est-ce qu’on guérit vraiment jamais après qu’on vous a poussé hors du nid ? Les choses se réparent, les choses se cicatrisent, on continue, mais à la fin on se retrouve à nouveau en chute libre. Nos becs s’empalent sur le sol et on est coincé à battre des ailes de haut en bas comme des chats qui mangent des sucettes. Toutes les vieilles blessures se rouvrent, les vieux trous de crevaison (morsures d’insectes, cette fois où on est tombé de bicyclette, la tendinite, la hernie) se mettent à suinter. La douleur fuit de nous. Nous sommes de sacrés suinteurs, à la fin, n’est-ce pas ?

17)

Une nuit alors que je suis couchée à côté de ma femme, sa poitrine s’ouvre et je regarde Kooza du Cirque du Soleil. L’acrobate se sert des côtes de ma femme comme corde raide ; les contorsionnistes se plient en deux à travers ses côtes et ressortent la tête comme des Gumbies. L’acrobate empile des chaises l’une sur l’autre, l’une sur l’autre, et puis grimpe à son tour, sans peur, pendant que les chaises tremblent. Je ris avec une joie toute enfantine, et ma femme se réveille, tousse et se retourne pendant que l’artiste de cirque dégringole.

Quand il a détalé, j’appuie ma joue sur ce que ma femme a perdu, mon poids la panique et elle se redresse tout d’un coup dans son lit. Elle se frotte les yeux et m’examine. Tu as une trace de fermeture éclair sur la joue, marmonne-t-elle.

Je tends la main et je touche les ondulations.

18)

J’en suis à l’âge de « mon ceci fait mal », où se trouve « mon ceci » est en réalité n’importe quelle partie du corps que vous voudriez insérer au hasard : oreille, coude, articulation, genou, utérus. Quelle relation ai-je avec ma douleur ? Je la sens brûler comme un moteur à combustion. Je trouve qu’elle a les yeux ternes et les épaules tombantes. Elle me regarde comme une proie, la plupart du temps, je crois, et elle vient sur mon cœur avec sa petite hache, hachure, hachure, comme un milan au parc national du Seregenti qui fait un piqué pour voler un sandwich à un touriste qui ne se doute de rien, et lui balafre la joue de ses serres. Quelle relation voudrais-je avoir à l’avenir avec ma douleur ? Je veux être sa divorcée homosexuelle.

19)

Il y a quelques semaines ma femme a battu le rappel pour un test de PSA avec un groupe de survivantes du cancer du sein. Un meurtre de survivantes du cancer, elles m’ont fait flipper avec leurs plumes noires et leurs croassements. Je ne peux pas faire face à ce qui les attend (ma femme). Le pronostic du cancer du sein de ma femme est bon mais ces derniers mois elle a mal en avalant et le chant vient au rythme de la chanson des enfants : yeux, oreilles, bouche et nez ! Sauf que pour les métastases du cancer du sein, c’est : Foie, poumons, sein et os ! Je ne connais pas bien le chant de l’infidélité… d’accord, mais je ne peux pas le chanter ici.

20)

Certaines nuits, la cicatrice de ma femme s’ouvre comme les nymphéas de Monet à l’Orangerie, une longue bande de peinture qui est toute méditation bleue et silence vert.

Avec l’intention… de… guérir, entonne un moine dans une robe couleur safran.

Je dois rester assise jusqu’au bout de ma douleur et me cuirasser le dos. Je dois entrer dans ma douleur, la traverser et aller au-delà.

Et l’exprimer par l’art.

Mon interprétation du sein perdu de ma femme est tranchée en sections et présentée comme des tranches de pain grillé debout, la tumeur phosphorescente à travers cinq lamelles. Anatomique, directe, guerrière, pleurant des larmes de sang.

Le Sein de ma Femme, par Georgia O’Keefe : une fleur rouge et striée tout en mouvement, une côte qui sort au niveau de la ligne du mamelon. Le Sein de ma Femme, par Pablo Picasso : un sein en spirale d’où poussent des cheveux, un sein avec un œil au lieu d’un mamelon, une tumeur au lieu de la tête de son modèle. Le Sein de ma Femme, par Emily Carr : sein comme arbre sombre et tortueux, tumeur comme nid d’oiseau. Le Sein de ma Femme, par Salvador Dali : un sein assis sur une côte, en train de fondre, un cadran d’horloge qui compte les jours qui lui restent. Le Sein de ma Femme, par Frida Kahlo : ma femme et moi tout habillées, main dans la main, une grande ombre à gauche de ma femme, des blessures qu’on voit à travers nos t-shirts, une longue balafre rouge et gonflée sur le côté droit de ma femme qui pompe le sang à travers une grosse veine vers mon cœur plus qu’énorme, engorgé et arythmique, pendant qu’il le pompe à nouveau– un parfait service à thé en argent et un loriquet sur une table d’un côté.

 

ENGLISH

 

Jane Eaton Hamilton vit à Vancouver en Colombie Britannique. Elle est l’auteur de Weekend and Love Will Burst into a Thousand Shapes. Elle est aussi l’auteur de Jessica’s Elevator, Body Rain, Steam-Cleaning Love, et July Nights and Other Stories. Ses livres ont été nominés pour le Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBT Fiction, le MIND Book Award, le Pat Lowther Award, le VanCity Award et le Ethel Wilson Prize in the BC Book Prizes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Master Class with Jill Soloway

nude1_oct_2016art: Jane Eaton Hamilton 2016

“Protagonism is propaganda that protects and perpetuates privilege.”

This is about story, kids. This is about the poems we write. The short fiction. The novels. The plays. The TV shows. The films.

What work we support and why we do it.

Check her out. The Female Gaze. The Feminist Gaze. Gazing on. Empathy generator. Fucking yes, finally. Bringing it into literature.

You get the idea that the world might be okay after all.

TIFF

Benedict Cumberbatch reads letter, Sol LeWitt to Eva Hesse

 screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-10-42-07-pm

Eva Hesse

Gish Jen said we must watch and heed. As I listened to the first part, I wondered if ever I’d had such a loss of control, if I’d ever made art, whether written or visual, with the untormented mind.

If you are a creative person, please listen. You won’t regret the time.

Benedict Cumberbatch

 

Phart on, babios

JEH acrylic on paper 2015

sketch: Jane Eaton Hamilton 2015, acrylic on paper

Making Little Sense, In All the Good Ways

FullSizeRender(1)

Matthew Schuler’s look at the ways creative minds differ from run-of-the-mill minds is interesting and useful.

Why Creative People Sometimes Make No Sense

On Writing Across the Curriculum

Magnolia2JEH

magnolia: Jane Eaton Hamilton, unknown year

Instead of asking me to repeat myself, why don’t you challenge yourself to expand? I am not ever going to make myself smaller, my talents fewer, my range tiny, in order to garner your praise.

Bird Nights, a short story

 Screen Shot 2016-01-14 at 1.42.23 AM

Here is a story I wrote more than 5 years ago, called “Bird Nights.” It came out first in Numéro Cinq and then was picked up by poet Marilyn Hacker for translation into French for Siécle 21, Paris, translated by Cécile Oumhani. I would be most honoured if you read it and left me your thoughts. It remains one of my favourite pieces of my writing. The news of my marital separation was still new when I wrote it, yet the story is as much travelogue as it is a raw cry from my heart. It also appeals to the side of me that likes subversive, fractured and braided narratives.

Bird Nights

Here is a story. It is true, but it is also full of lies. And small axes, the kind that make tiny cross-hatchings on hearts.

1)

A surgeon flayed open my wife’s chest and removed her breast: stiches and staples. This was several years ago. While she sleeps her scar unzips (top tape extension, top stop, slider, pull tab), her flesh unfolding like a sleeping bag. Some nights I only see the corset bones that girdle her lungs, gleaming moon slivers in murky red sky, and I say a prayer for them, those pale canoe ribs, those pickup sticks that are all that cinch her in. I wish I could do that: I wish I could hold her together. Some nights I think she may fly away in all directions, north, east, south, west, a huge splatter. She will go so far so fast I will only be able to watch with my mouth fallen open. She’ll be gone, and all I’ll have is a big red mess to clean up and a sliver of rib sticking out of my eye.

2)

Quiver trees are weird enough anyhow, but add a Sociable Weaver nest and you’ve got a real visual pickle. Warty, sponge toffee boils, these bird condos of dry grasses have upwards of 100 different holes for individual families; the nests can house 400 birds. Interestingly, Sociable Weavers are polyamorous, even, apparently, with barbets and finches.

In Namaqualand, Cape Weavers go it individually. The males court females by weaving testicular-like sacs, and if a female remains unimpressed, the male builds a second sac under the first, and etcetera, until a wind knocks the whole shebang down.

Bird-land, human-land—it’s all pretty much just jostling to get and keep the girl.

3)

Some nights when my wife’s incision unzips, a rib extends and on it sits a yellow bird, swaying as if in a great wind, feathers ruffling to lemon combs. I love birds. It makes me happy to hear her song, the same way it makes me happy when my wife sings. (Once when we were fresh, my wife danced naked through our kitchen belting out girl group songs from the 60s.) The little bird warbles and trills, then launches off the rib to fly around our bedroom. She grabs a mosquito near my ear. She flits into the corners, around the light fixtures, and carries back bits of yarn pulled from sweaters, spiderwebs, plastic pricetag spears, dust bunnies. She constructs a nest, shivers down into it, and lays little gelatinous eggs, eggs that I trust, with a simple, guileless trust, will grow up to be lymph nodes for my wife. These bird nights, I am happy, so happy. On some inchoate level, I know the little yellow bird has our backs, and I drift off to trills of sugary bird song.

4)

I hang out on bird-lover websites, where questions abound: Why are my lovebirds changing colour? Aphids–my bird is okay with them, but I’m not? Lovebird feather plucking?

Feather loss, says Avian Web, is a difficult problem to cure when the picking behaviour is already established. Birds should be presented to Dr Marshall at the first signs of picking. My wife and I are feather-plucking. We didn’t go to Dr Marshall and maybe that’s our problem. Our relationship has thrush, bacteria, poor nutrition. My wife and I were once lovebirds. Once, for a nanosecond, We Two Were One. Then, for years, We Two Were One and A Half. Eventually, We Two Were Two. Now, the evidence suggests We Might Be Three.

5)

Birds enchant me. Once we took our daughter to a free flight aviary, the Lory Loft in Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. Having a 20-hectare hillside park entirely devoted to birds is guaranteed to make someone like me giddy. Lories are small parrots, and in the aviaries, as you whoop and wriggle and scream over suspension bridges high in the treetops, they land on you, they cover you. It’s as if the keepers are up on the rooftop squeezing tubes of oil paint, cadmium orange and cobalt blue and carmine and viridian, screechy territorial colours with a lot of wing flap and pecking.

Ornithologists at the park answer such questions as: Will an ostrich egg support the weight of an adult human? I grapple with this one: Will my human heart support the shifting weight of my wife’s loyalties?

6)

Foraging: The Way to Keep Your [Wife] Mentally Stimulated and Happy

It’s me that forages. Watch me some nights, thumbing through theatre tickets (Wicked! The Vagina Monologues! Avenue Q! My Year of Magical Thinking!) and museum exhibitions (Dali: Painting and Film; Picasso and Britain; Carr, O’Keeffe, Kahlo: Places of Their Own) and the detritus that falls from her scar, stirring through wind-up rabbits and plastic zombies and voodoo dolls that tumble free, all the secrets and suffering that she hoards deep inside.

What am I looking for? Something to eat, maybe. Bird seed. A steak.

7)

We met a woman in Namibia who lost most of one breast to a crocodile attack. She was a member of a polygamous tribe, the Himba, whose women wear only loincloths. She bent down at the river with her water gourd, breasts hanging as breasts will do after a bunch of kids, and a croc’s teeth snapped closed on the right one.

Who knows what this woman’s husband thinks when he takes her shriveled, croc-mangled right breast into his hand? Does he trace her history with reverence? Does he spit in disgust and choose another wife?

8)

There are local stories of wives who change in the bathroom, wear bras and prosthetics to bed, and husbands who shun them. There are stories of marital disintegration, and by that I mean what you probably assume: straight marriage. I don’t know the stats for queer marriage breakups after breast cancer. I do know that even after twelve years, when my wife or I drive past the Cancer Agency, not even thinking about what happened, on our way to other appointments and sometimes in the midst of great happiness, one or other of us will burst into tears.

9)

Vancouver has murders of crows, and our house is on their flight path. If you go outside in the dawn gloaming, such as when you are going for chemo, they fill a Hitchcockian sky with black shrieks, and if you could count them, you would run out of numbers before you’d run out of birds. Crows are not protected in BC, and their forest roost was recently ripped down to build a Costco; now tens of thousands roost in a tangle of electric wires and pallets of home building supplies. Their noise is deafening.

10)

Magic realism aside, my wife’s scar is really just a scar, plain, unremarkable, faded with time. (Plain, unremarkable. I tell you. Plain and unremarkable.) Here is the pedestrian truth: she is sort of concave there where her breast once was, a hollowed-out nest. She opted not to have a reconstruction. Her one breast is very small and she goes braless without a prosthetic, which is a loud story, actually, the only blaring part of the reality-struck, pedestrian story: she is obviously one-breasted, especially in t-shirts, and manly anyway, so people stare. Last week at an art opening, a little boy about seven stopped from a dead run and ran his eyes up and down her, up and down her, up and down her, trying to make her make sense.

(These days, I do the same thing, rake my eyes across her. The little boy is right: she no longer makes sense. She is always saying goodbye with her actions while she smiles hello with her lips.)

11)

My heart is a big old blood pump with places engorged like a balloon (I’ve got a big old cardiomyopathy for you, I tell my wife sometimes, but it’s actually heart failure.) My heart is giving up, and has necrotic spots like measles, dead bits which have been dead now for 25 years, what an anniversary: let’s have a cake and candles, happy necrosis to me!). Referring to my circulatory system, a cardiologist once said to me: The tree of you is dying. No doubt too many polygamous weavers? How does this feel for you? my therapist asked about our lives (relationship) going—yes—tits up, three tits up I guess, instead of four, and here is the answer, my letter to my pain: It feels exactly like my heart is failing. Right now it’s stuttering along arrhythmically, but it can’t pump through all these emotions and old, ruptured scars, so it may just keep engorging till I pop like a-

12)

Tumour?

13)

Once I co-owned a grey cockatiel named Hemingway. Hemingway would hop around my scapula and peck food from my teeth while molting grey feathers onto my breasts. He was a happy bird with a yellow comb, but he never, as far as I know, wrote a great story.

14)

At the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa, my wife ran at ostriches while the wild Benguela current tossed waves on the beach. Ostriches have a nail on each of their feet that is capable of slicing a person open as efficiently as any surgeon’s blade. I was up on my toes with alarm, but the ostriches didn’t fight, they only ran, their stunted wings extended. Then the male turned and knocked my wife flat. He danced on her chest until his pea-sized brain got bored.

Just a game, just a game, she assured me afterwards, brushing off, none the worse for wear. I wasn’t really dead.

(This is a lie.)

15)

At Okonjima for cheetahs, I was fascinated instead by the hornbills—those bills and casques! Female hornbills use their droppings to seal themselves into their nests. I did this too, when my wife was diagnosed, but I used an alarm system instead of poop. I’m doing it again, now, but I’m using perimeter lighting, as if shining sunbeams into my wife’s shadows will keep my marriage intact.

16)

My wife’s skin is numb, did I mention that? That’s how her spirit must have healed from all that trauma (PTSD), don’t you think, with a big old numb spot? On the outside of her, cut nerves sometimes go crazy, like a pain orchestra, a violin screech, a flute shrill. Yowey. When I lay beside her and trail my finger across her chest, through her armpit, across the skin near her arm on her back, she can’t feel a thing. Here? I say and she shakes her head. Nothing. Here? Still nothing. Here? Nope. Here? Kinda, sorta, not really.

Does anyone ever really heal after being pushed out of the nest? Things repair, things scar, we go on, but eventually, we find ourselves in free fall anew. Our beaks impale the ground so we’re stuck flapping upside down like cat-lollipops. All the old wounds break open, the old puncture holes (insect bites, that time we fell off our bikes, the tendonitis, the hernia) ooze. We’re all leaking pain. We’re all bloody oozers, in the end, aren’t we?

17)

One night as I lie beside my wife, her chest opens and I watch Cirque du Soleil’s Kooza. The acrobats use my wife’s ribs as tightropes; the contortionists bend double through her ribs and poke their heads back out, like Gumbies. The acrobat stacks chairs one atop another atop another atop another, and then climbs atop himself, fearless, while the chairs shake. I laugh aloud in pure childish glee, and my wife awakens, coughs, and resettles as the performer tumbles.

When he’s scurried away, I rest my cheek in my wife’s loss, my sudden weight causing her to panic and sit bolt upright. She rubs her eyes and peers at me. You have the imprint of a zipper on your cheek, she mumbles.

I reach up and touch the corrugations.

18)

I am at the “my this hurts” age, where “this” is really any body part you want to interject at random: ear, elbow, knuckle, knee, uterus. What relationship do I have to my pain? I find it hot like a combustion engine. I find it has very droopy eyes, and shoulders that slope. It sees me as prey, mostly, I’d guess, and comes at my heart with its little axe, cross-hatch, cross-hatch, like a Kite in the Serengeti dive-bombing to steal a sandwich from an unsuspecting tourist’s hands, talons gashing a cheek. What relationship do I want to have in the future with my pain? I want to be its gay divorcée.

19)

My wife drummed for a PSA a few weeks ago with a group of breast cancer survivors. A murder of breast cancer survivors, they freaked me out with their black feathers and cawing. I can’t handle what’s coming for them (for my wife). The prognosis for my wife’s breast cancer is good, but the last months she has had pain on swallowing, and the chant arrives in the rhythm of the children’s song: Eyes, ears, mouth and nose! Except for breast cancer mets it’s: Liver, lungs, breast and bone! I’m not sure what the song for infidelity is….okay, I am, but I can’t sing it here.

20)

Some nights my wife’s scar opens like Monet’s water lilies at L’Orangerie, a long wide strip of art that is all blue meditation and green silence.

Intending… to… heal, intones a monk in a saffron robe.

I must sit through my pain and gird my back. I must go into my pain and through and beyond my pain.

And come out into art.

My own rendition of my wife’s lost breast is sliced into sections and presented like upright pieces of toast, the tumour glowing in phosphorescence across five slides. Anatomical, direct, confrontational, weeping blood tears.

My Wife’s Breast, by Georgia O’Keefe: a striated red flower full of motion, a rib protruding at the nipple line. My Wife’s Breast, by Pablo Picasso: a spiral breast sprouting hair, a breast with an eye instead of a nipple, a tumour instead of his model’s head. My Wife’s Breast, by Emily Carr: breast as swirling dark tree, tumour as bird’s nest. My Wife’s Breast, by Savadore Dali: a breast sitting on a rib, melting, a clock face ticking down her remaining days. My Wife’s Breast, by Frieda Kahlo: my wife and I completely clothed, hand in hand, a large shadow to my wife’s left, our injuries showing through our t-shirts, a long red, swollen gash on my wife’s right side that pumps blood across a thick vein to my over-huge, engorged, arrhythmic heart while it pumps it back–a perfect silver tea service and a yellow bird in a cage of ribs to one side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download Free Art Books from the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 1.37.01 PM

“You could pay $118 on Amazon for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s catalog The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry. Or you could pay $0 to download it at MetPublications, the site offering “five decades of Met Museum publications on art history available to read, download, and/or search for free.” If that strikes you as an obvious choice, prepare to spend some serious time browsing MetPublications’ collection of free art books and catalogs.” Open Culture

%d bloggers like this: